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About Livestock branding


image1: Hannoveraner Brand 0001.jpg
image2: Hannoveraner Brandzeichen.svg
footer: A hot brand on a together with the silhouette of the brandIn Australia, all , Part Bred Arabians, s, s, s, and the nine pony breeds registered in the Australian Pony Stud Book must be branded with an owner brand on the near (left) shoulder and an individual foaling drop number (in relation to the other foals) over the foaling year number on the off shoulder. In , these three brands may be placed on the near shoulder in the above order. Stock Horse and Quarter Horse classification brands are placed on the hindquarters by the classifiers.Thoroughbreds and s in Australia and are freeze branded. Standardbred brands are in the form of the Alpha Angle Branding System (AABS), which the also uses.In the , branding of horses is not generally mandated by the government; however, there are a few exceptions: captured made available for adoption by the are freeze branded on the neck, usually with the AABS or with numbers, for identification. Horses that test positive for , that are d for life rather than , will be freeze branded for permanent identification. of any breed are usually required by state racing commissions to have a lip , to be identified at the track. Some have, at times, offered freeze branding as either a requirement for registration or simply as an optional benefit to members, and individual horse owners may choose branding as a means by which to permanently identify their animals. As of 2011, the issue of whether to mandate horses be implanted with RFID microchips under the generated considerable controversy in the United States.File:Brand-aa-2.svg|Anglo-ArabianFile:Arabisches Vollblut Brandzeichen.svg| File:Bayerisches Warmblut Brandzeichen.svg| Bavarian WarmbloodFile:Holsteiner Brandzeichen.svg| File:Oldenburger Brandzeichen.JPG|File:Zuchtverband Sachsen-Thüringen Brandzeichen.svg| Regional stud farm Moritzburg for Saxony and File:Trakehner Brandzeichen.svg| TrakehnerFile:Kaltbrand eines Rennpferdes.jpg|Numerical freeze brand==Symbols and terminology==Most brands in the United States include capital letters or s, often combined with other symbols such as a slash, circle, half circle, cross, or bar. Brands of this type have a specialized language for calling the brand. Some owners prefer to use simple s; these brands are called using a short description of the picture (e.g., rising sun). Reading a brand aloud is referred to as “calling the brand“. Brands are called from left to right, top to bottom, and when one character encloses another, from outside to inside. Reading of complex brands and picture brands depends at times upon the owners interpretation, and it may require an expert to identify some of the more complex marks.Terms used are:Upright symbols are called normally by the letters, numbers or other symbols involved.Crazy: An upside down symbol. An upside down R would be read as Crazy R.Reverse: A reversed symbol. would be read as Reverse K. Reverse is sometimes called Back (i.e. a backwards C would be read as Back C).Crazy Reverse: An upside down, reversed symbol. An upside down, reversed K would be read as Crazy Reverse KLazy: Symbols turned 90 degrees. Also, a symbol turned 90 degrees, lying on its face (or right hand side) can be read as Lazy Down or Lazy Right . Similarly, a symbol turned 90 degrees, lying on its back (or left hand side) can be read as Lazy Up or Lazy Left. would be read as Lazy 5 or Lazy Up 5 or Lazy Left 5.Tumbling: a symbol tipped about 45 degrees.Flying: a symbol that starts and ends with a short or short horizontal line attached before the left side of the top of the symbol and attached to the right side of the symbol, extending to the right of the symbol.Walking: a symbol with a short horizontal line attached to the bottom of the symbol, extending to the right of the symbol.“Running”: a letter with a curving flare attached to the right side of the top of the letter, extending to the right, with the symbol sometimes also leaning to the right like an italic letter.Over: a symbol over above another symbol, but not touching the other symbol. An H above a P would be read as H Over P.Bar: a short horizontal line. For example, a short horizontal line over an M or before an M would be read as Bar M. Similarly, a short horizontal line under an M or after an M would be read as M Bar. The bar can also be through the middle of the symbol and would be read as Bar M.Rail: alternative terminology to bar in some areas referencing a long horizontal line. For example, a long horizontal line over a M or before an M would be read as Rail M. Similarly, a long horizontal line under a M or after a M would be read as M Rail.Stripe: three or more rails, one above the others.Box: a symbol within a square or rectangle or a square or rectangle by itself.Diamond: a symbol within a four sided box, the box tilted 45 degrees or a four sided box tilted 45 degrees by itself. The box sides are of equal length, and the box can be square or taller in height than in width, or greater in width than in height.Rafter or Half Diamond: a half diamond over or under another symbol, but not touching the other symbol. A K with a half diamond over it, Open side facing the K, can be read as Rafter K or Half Diamond K. A K with a half diamond under it, open side facing K, can be read as K Rafter or K Half Diamond.Circle: a symbol within a circle, or a circle by itself.Half Circle or Quarter Circle: a half or quarter circle above or below a symbol, but not touching the symbol. A K with a half circle above it, open side facing up, would be read as Half Circle K. A K with a half circle below it, open side facing down, would be read as K Half Circle.Combinations of symbols can be made with each symbol distinct, or:Connected or conjoined, with symbols touching. would be read as T S connected or TS conjoined.Combined or conjoined: symbols are partially overlaid. would be read as J K Combined.Hanging: a symbol beneath another symbol and touching the other symbol. The hanging nomenclature may be omitted when reading the brand, such as a H with a P below it, with the top of the P touching the bottom of the right hand side of the H would be read as H Hanging P, or just H P.Swinging: a symbol beneath a quarter circle, the open side of the quarter circle facing the symbol, with the symbol touching the quarter circle. For example, a H with a quarter circle over it, with the top of the H touching the quarter circle would be read as Swinging H.Rocking: a symbol above a quarter circle, the open side of the quarter circle facing the symbol, with the bottom of the symbol touching the quarter circle. For example, a H with a quarter circle under it, with the bottom of the H touching the quarter circle, is read as Rocking H.==See also==
Livestock branding is a technique for marking livestock so as to identify the owner. Originally, livestock branding only referred to a hot brand for large stock, though the term is now also used to refer to other alternative techniques such as freeze branding. Other forms of livestock identification include inner lip or ear tattoos, earmarking, ear tagging, and RFID tagging with a type of microchip. The semi-permanent paint markings used to identify sheep are called a paint or colour brand. In the American West, branding evolved into a complex marking system still in use today.